Why Many Marketing Programs Fail at Delivering Sales Growth

By Ira Bowman:

Have you ever spent money on a marketing campaign, expecting to increase sales and been disappointed with the results?  You are not alone!

Far too many businesses are reliant solely on marketing efforts to fix their slumping sales.  Marketing and sales go hand in glove, but they are very different processes.  There are many in the business world who cannot tell the difference between the sales and marketing.  The confusion between the two functions leads many to frustration!

Read the entire article here!

 

Happier with Less

Times are changing fast all around the world. A lot of people keep saying: “ah those good old days”. The old days were much simpler and people were used to living with much less.

Just think about it for a second. Did they have cell phones or television or Internet? Did they care if they would buy a new car every two years? Did they have stacks of clothes hanging in closets unused?

People were happy with one good pair of shoes, one Sunday outfit and a roof over their heads. OK I get it; nobody wants to live in what we have come to label as poverty anymore.

BUT living with less can actually make you happier.

My husband and I decided to do just that, and you can’t imagine how much happier we are. As a result, we spend MUCH less, we actually have extra money left at the end of each month.

I will explain how we do it. In my last blog I explained how to create a budget. Using this budget, we see and decide how we can save even more.

Here’s the list:

  1. We never have lights on except for the room in which we are sitting.
  2. We have only ONE television set. No need to pay high cable bills.
  3. We did a research and cut the home phone line completely. We are only using our cell phones. We save about $120.00 per month. And you can add your cell phone to your local police station for reverse 911 calls and emergencies.
  4. We switch computers off at night and unplug everything from the walls. We managed to pay an average electric bill of $25 per month.
  5. We never let the water run while brushing our teeth. It’s a waste
  6. We use small space heaters and not the central heating unit, because this way we are warm where we sit and spend much less energy.
  7. We eat out once every other month. The rest of the time, we socialize with our friends and share dinners at our homes. We are having so much fun.
  8. We have a set grocery list and never “cheat”. We buy what we actually eat and never have to throw good food away. For a household of two, we pay no more than $850 per month for groceries, cleaning supplies, and cosmetics.
  9. We have created a “wish” list of clothes, shoes and accessories, and we send it to our friends and family. We have decided that receiving what we need during Christmas and our birthdays, makes it easy on the people who want to buy gifts for us, and we almost spend zero on clothing anymore.
  10. We don’t buy magazines. We can read everything we need online.

You can play with this list idea and you will see how much simpler your life will get and how much money you can save with little effort. We are very happy and wish you all the same! Life is about living happy and within our means.

Business Relationships

So many people are telling me that they are having complaints, problems, and are unsure as how to smooth out their professional relationships.

The rule is: NEVER mix personal and professional. If you do business with a friend and have any issue at all, keep it on a professional level. DO NOT share with your friends and family. This is totally unprofessional and the start of your problems.

ALWAYS be open, talk it out, and respect what the other person has to offer. Business relationships of any kind have a start point and a finish point. When you close such a relationship, be very clear as to why you chose to do so, and part amicably. Some of my clients have followed my advice and are very thankful for it, because they have saved personal relationships and their professional integrity this way.
It is a disaster when your friends draw their own conclusions, when in fact they are clueless about business or the specific relationship/contract that has ended.

One of the facts of small business owners is that they find someone they like on a personal level, and try to do business with them. They are so eager to solve all their problems at once that they usually don’t “hear” what the other party is offering. They just follow their wishful thinking, even though they are not clear about what they expect from a deal. The deal goes on and they discover midflight that the services offered are different than their expectations.

There are different approaches to solving that, and you be the judge of which is the correct way:

  1. You sit down and talk, explain in detail your expectations as a client, and if both parties find out that this relationship does not benefit either party, you simply and professionally say goodbye. Chapter closed.
  2. You are unsure of what your exact needs are, you are not satisfied with the services you receive, and you do not share your thoughts exactly, but decide to end this business relationship. You then proceed to talking to others, who in return have their own opinions and the professional who offers his/her services, starts being criticized to no fault of their own. Be very careful about toying with someone’s reputation and integrity.
  3. You sever both personal and professional relationship because you mix personal and professional issues.

In a few words, business is business, and friendship is friendship. Do not make it personal. Do not treat other professionals in a way that you would hate to be treated. These are shark infested waters and guess what? Someone might actually seek legal action against you for slandering, especially if you are dealing with a bigger company.

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